The Orvis fly-fishing blog celebrates all things fly fishing, featuring top-notch articles, tips, photos, videos, podcasts and the latest fly-fishing news. From trout fishing in the famed rivers of Montana to brown-lining for carp in the urban jungle to chasing sailfish of the coast of Baja, we cover all sides of the sport we love. Regular features include Tuesday Tips, which will make you a better angler, and the Friday Fly-Fishing Film Festival, made up of the best videos from around the world.

Video: How to Tie an Olive X-Caddis


Written by: Phil Monahan

Because caddisflies tend to emerge very quickly, trout don’t want to expend too much energy chasing them. Instead, the fish focus on those emergers that are crippled or are struggling to escape the nymphal shuck. The X-Caddis, developed by famed West Yellowstone guide and shop-owner Craig Mathews, imitates just such an insect, with a trailing shuck of Zelon and a splayed wing of. . .

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Squaw Valley Fly-Fishing Festival This Saturday!


Written by: Phil Monahan

Last weekend, Reno was the center of the fly-fishing world, but nearby Squaw Valley, California, continues the focus this weekend, with a great, FREE fly-fishing festival featuring casting lessons from guide Matt Heron, a casting competition, and films from the Fly-Fishing Film Tour, among other cool angling activities. (You may remember Matt Heron as that guy who. . .

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Tuesday Tip: Get Naked for Nymphing in Still Water


Phil Rowley hoists a fine Falcon’s Ledge rainbow caught using the “naked” technique.

photo courtesy Phil Rowley

This spring, I was once again in Utah at Falcon’s Ledge for another of my stillwater schools. Callibaetis and damselflies were active on the lodge lakes. The fishing was so good that Falcon’s Ledge guide and friend, Grant Bench, and I were busy every evening replenishing lost flies for. . .

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Fourth and Final Teaser of Documentary on Fight to Save the Aysén Region of Patagonia


Written by: Phil Monahan

AITUE /Pesca con Mosca/Conservacion de la Patagonia/ Teaser 4-4 from AITUE on Vimeo.

We have been posting the stunning video teasers for an upcoming film doumenting the fight to keep one of the world’s most pristine fisheries from being destroyed by a massive hydroelectric project. Above is the final teaser and the rest can be seen by clicking the “READ MORE” button.

To recap, here’s a brief description of the struggle being waged:

HidroAysén is a $3 to $4 billion hydroelectric scheme that, if fully realized, would build five massive dams by 2020 in the Aysén region of Chilean Patagonia. Two would go on the Baker River, three more on the Pascua—along with 1,500 miles of transmission lines.
The dams would capture the furious turquoise flow emanating from the two largest ice caps outside Greenland and Antarctica to spin turbines for electricity. The transmission lines would run north, held by towers more than 200 feet high. Following a winding corridor almost 400 feet wide, a thousand miles of forest would be clear-cut and the rest of the corridor’s path similarly cleared. The corridor would intersect 64 communities and 14 protected areas. It would divide endangered forests and some of Chile’s most spectacular national parks.

You can read more about the issues at the Sin Represas website. But first, watch these gorgeous films at full-screen and in high-definition to see what is at stake.

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Orvis Booth Boys Tom Rosenbauer, Sean Combs and Jim Lepage Report in from Reno

Last week, the Orvis Helios 2 was the hit of the International Fly Tackle Dealer show in Reno, Nevada. If you haven’t seen the H2 video yet, click here to see what the excitement is all about.

Tom and Jim sent in the following pictures to prove they were actually working and not out fishing the whole time. Still, it doesn’t look like a tough gig.

Brian O’Keefe and Todd Moen of “Catch” Magazine (center) try levitating the new H2 rod and case with Orvis’ Sean Combs (left) and Tom Rosenbauer.

Jim Lepage (second from right) of Orvis Rod and Tackle shows he is willing to go to great lengths to find the only the best fly-tying material.

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