Pictures of the Day: Seeking a Cure in Wydaho

Written by: Jim Lampros, Fishing Manager of Orvis Cleveland

Wydaho Trout

The author seems pleased with this gorgeous cutthroat.

photo courtesy Jim Lampros

[Editor's note: I received these great photos, along with a somewhat feverish tale, from Jim Lampros last week. The writing here makes me question whether his symptoms have been alleviated or if he has only become sicker.]

I’ve been told it’s a disease for which there is no cure. It presents in the form of a visibly flushed face, bronzish gold skin, and legions of black spots becoming more pronounced towards the hind end. Hallucinations day and night, visions of snake-infested canyons, scorching heat, raging death-water. Recurring nightmares in which I’m forced to stare relentlessly at a little piece of foam floating around, and around, and around, all the while hoping it would just disappear. After nearly a year of suffering, I caved. Denial was getting me nowhere. I packed up the truck and headed for a specialty clinic on the Wyoming/Idaho border, convincing a couple buddies to ride along lest I should go astray.

Wydaho Trout

The brown trout were also spectacular.

photo courtesy Jim Lampros

The ailment is best treated progressively, so we began with small doses. It wasn’t a cure by any means, but it did help to ease the pain. At times, I even forgot about it altogether.

After many, many miles and all the pre-meds I could handle, we’d arrived. It was time for the good stuff. The hard part about this form of treatment is that you see it coming long before it reaches your veins. If you’re twitchy or jumpy, it just complicates the process. The best thing you can do is hold your breath, count to three, and let it hit you. When it does, things get blurry for a second; the snakes and sun and spots and water all flash at once, and suddenly your arm feels heavy. Don’t worry; that’s just the medicine at work. From the weight in your hand comes a feeling of euphoria that spreads throughout the body, blocking out all background noise, leaving only you and what’s directly in front of you. A calmness takes over and for a second, everything is alright.

I may not be cured, but I strongly endorse this form of treatment for anyone suffering a similar ailment.”

Jim Lampros, Fishing Manager of Orvis Cleveland, just returned from a 4,200-mile road trip, fishing across Wyoming and Idaho in search of native cutthroat, settling for wild rainbows, brookies, and browns along the way.

Wydaho Trout

It’s easy to understand how trout like these can inspire a fever for more.

photo courtesy Jim Lampros

Wydaho Trout

A long way from their native waters, the wild brookies maintain their gorgeous colors.

photo courtesy Jim Lampros

Wydaho Trout

Another beautiful cutthroat specimen makes the author smile.

photo courtesy Jim Lampros

Wydaho Trout

It’s easy to see how the cutthroat got its name.

photo courtesy Jim Lampros

Share this with your friends:






Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>