Video: How to Rig Your Rod to Move to a New Fishing Spot

Written by: Peter Kutzer

Welcome to another installment of “Ask an Orvis Fly-Fishing Instructor,” with me, Peter Kutzer. In this episode, I demonstrate how to rig your rod when you want to move to a new fishing spot. Walking through the woods with a fly rod can be a dangerous proposition, and more than a few tips get broken this way.

The best way to rig the rod keeps your tippet from crimping, keeps the line-to-leader connection from getting stuck in the tip top, and lets you get back to fishing as quickly as possible. Good luck!

Previous episodes:

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor I: Casting Heavy Flies in the Wind

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor II: Roll-Casting for Accuracy & Distance

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor III: Casting in the Wind

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor IV: Casting Accuracy

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor V: The Curve Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor VI: Casting Angles

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor VII: How to Double Haul

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor VIII: Fixing Tailing Loops

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor IX: How to Make Delicate Presentations

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor X: The Steeple Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XI: How to Avoid Hitting Your Rod with Your Fly

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XII: Don’t be a Creep

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XIII: Parachute and Pile Casts

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XIV: How to Make a Reach Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XV: How to Make a Tuck Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XVI: How to Make an Aerial Mend

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XVII: How to Make Roll and Switch Casts with a Two-Handed Rod

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XVIII: The Basic Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XIX: The Bow & Arrow Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XX: The “Ready Position” and Fishing from a Boat

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XXI: The Basic Back Cast

Ask a Fly-Fishing Instructor XXII: How to Add Distance to Your Cast

4 thoughts on “Video: How to Rig Your Rod to Move to a New Fishing Spot

  1. T.L.

    Good stuff as usual, never tried flicking the rod to get the fly off the guide, will try it on the next outing. Thanks.

    Reply
  2. Peter

    Great tip with one exception – never walk with your rod pointing in front of you. You will break your tip quicker than anything if you snag a bush or trip. Seen my wife do it more than once.

    Reply
    1. Phil Monahan

      In some cases, the ability to thread your rod through branches and tree trunks makes the rod-forward approach the best option. That said, I usually do carry it pointing rearward. The problem there is that sometimes the line catches a branch. So there are positives and negatives to each way.

      Reply

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